• Adrian Fedyk

Updated: Jul 7

SUPPORTING GOVERNMENT & DVSA ADVICE

Although certain restrictions will be lifted on July 19th, I will still require all pupils to wear a face mask and clean their hands before lessons, until further notice.



SAFETY GUIDANCE FOR PUPILS & INSTRUCTORS


At this time the population does not have total immunity from COVID-19 and, as yet, although the rollout of the vaccines is progressing extremely well, the virus still has the potential to spread extensively.


All Driving Instructors, therefore, will need to remain alert and make their own risk assessments concerning the provision of a safe system of work. The health and wellbeing of pupils, ourselves and those closest to us must be our primary consideration if we are able to safely work.


Therefore, I will still require all pupils to wear a face mask during lessons, and to ensure that they thoroughly clean their hands before the lesson starts.


I fully support the government and the DVSA and I will follow all advice given.

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  • Adrian Fedyk


All vehicles vary in how they behave when turning at various road speeds.


Some respond less than you expect in relation to the amount of turn you give the wheel (understeer). Some respond more (oversteer).


You must get to know the characteristics of your vehicle, before you drive in traffic, and drive extra carefully until you are familiar with its behaviour.


Turning


When turning the steering wheel, avoid crossing your hands. Expect at low speeds, this can reduce your control and can cause an accident. Feed the rim of the steering wheel through your hands. Vary your hand movements according to the amount of lock you want.


This is called the pull-push technique.


To turn left:

  • Slide your left hand up the wheel, but not beyond 12 o'clock

  • Pull the wheel downwards with your left hand. At the same time, slide your right hand down the wheel against the direction that the wheel is turning

  • Grip and push up with your right hand while you slide your left hand up the wheel

  • Repeat the second and third steps as necessary.

To turn right:

  • Slide your right hand up the wheel, but not beyond 12 o'clock

  • Pull the wheel downwards with your right hand. At the same time, slide your left hand down the wheel against the direction that the wheel is turning

  • Grip and push up with your left hand while you slide your right hand up the wheel

  • Repeat the second and third steps as necessary.


To straighten up after the turn


Feed the wheel back through your hands in the opposite direction. Try not to allow the wheel to spin back uncontrolled


On the open road, hold the wheel at ten-to-two or quarter-to-three, and turn the wheel as necessary to maintain a steady course.


Looking well ahead will help you to avoid straightening up too late.

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  • Adrian Fedyk

Thinking distance depends on how quickly you react. It takes well over half a second for most people to react.


If you are tired or unwell, it will take longer.


If you are driving at 20 mph, you'll travel about 6 metres (20 feet) before your brakes even begin to act:

  • At 30 mph, 9 metres (30 feet)

  • At 40 mph, 12 metres (40 feet).

And so on.


Braking Distance


This depends greatly on your speed and the size and weight of your vehicle.


It has even more effect on the overall stopping distance

  • At 20 mph, good brakes will stop your vehicle in about 6 metres (20 feet) on a dry road

  • At 40 mph (twice the speed), they will take 24 metres (80 feet) - FOUR times the distance.

You need to allow much more time and room to brake in bad weather. On wet roads allow double the normal stopping distance and ten times where the roads are icy.


Also your tyres won't grip the road surface so well:

  • On loose road surfaces

  • If there is any diesel spilt on the road.

In these conditions allow much more time and room to brake.


The Two Second Rule


Far too many accidents are caused by drivers getting too close to the vehicle in front.


It's essential that every driver is able to judge a safe separation distance in all road, traffic and weather conditions.


The safety of you and your passengers depends on it!


In good dry conditions an alert driver, who is driving a vehicle with first class tyres and brakes, needs to be at least two seconds behind the vehicle in front.


In bad conditions, double the safety gap to at least four seconds or even more.


How to Measure The Two Second Gap?


Choose an obvious stationary reference point ahead, such as a bridge, a tree or a road sign.


When the vehicle ahead passes the object say to yourself:


'Only a Fool breaks the two-second rule'.


If you reach the object before you finish saying it, you're too close. Multiple collisions often happen because the drivers involved were driving too close and were unable to brake in time.


You can avoid such accidents by looking well ahead and keeping your distance.


Give yourself time to react.


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